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GRAMMAR  SCHOOL

Colquitt Christian Academy 3rd Grade

Third grade is the year that students grow up. Students will be reading to learn instead of just learning to read. Students will read great stories from literature and history, and some stories will be just for fun! Stories and fables and fairytales are very important for third graders to share as common knowledge, and the students will read and listen to many in third grade. Poetry and scripture memorization will be included too. Students will learn how to locate. chapters and verses in the Bible so they become familiar with their own Bibles and hopefully develop the lifelong habit of daily Bible-reading.
There is MUCH to learn in third grade: cursive writing, mutiplication and division facts, history timeline, scientific procedures, and English grammar. Although many of these skills are just continuations of skills already learned, some will be new and challenging. Students will be taught to keep up with their own materials, homework, and assignments. They will learn to depend upon parents less and less to do such work for them, and they will learn to take ownership of their own learning and organization. Third grade is where students become 'big kids."
“Train up a child in the way he should go and when he is old he will not depart from it.” Proverbs 22:6
Third Grade Level Course Description

BIBLE
Theme/Master

Question:        
Kings to Acts (integrated with history) Kings of Israel, Prophets, Gospels, The New Church

Description:
This class is a graded course intended to build the students’ love of Scripture and knowledge of the historical events and context of the books of Judges through Kings. Emphasis is placed on practical application through teacher-led devotions and memorization of key passages aimed at building character and godliness.   

This is done through: 
completion of worksheets and tests from the Bible curriculum; chanting and singing the series of events; research work by small groups and individuals on specific projects; integration with art, geography, history, and music; building models, making drawings, writing stories, playing games, and making collections and displays; dedicated memory work time during “memory period”; field trips to related sites and museum exhibits (when applicable);guest speakers (when applicable); teacher-led devotionals.

Grammar
Theme/Master


Question: 
The order in grammar shows the order in God’s creation.  

Description:
This course completes the early phase of the grammar school study of formal English grammar as well as the fundamentals of composition. Students learn and apply basic parts of speech, write simple, complete sentences, use proper spelling and punctuation, and begin to put their ideas into words, phrases, and compositions. These fundamentals of expression are essential for all future study in the school.

This is done through: 
primarily large-group instruction in parsing-classifying sentences/grammar; review of all basic grammar instruction through repeated chants, jingles, and applications; individual instruction and editing; class spelling bees; using imitation of well-written works to teach writing skills; integration with other subjects in writing / oral presentations; frequent creative writing exercises involving the elements of a story, connected with literature/reading; keeping a common placing journal from 1st to 4th grades, incorporating quotes, handwriting, or other nongraded exercises to instill a love for common placing and prepare students for logic and rhetoric common placing.

Spelling/Penmanship
Theme/Master


Question: 
What helps us to spell and write clearly and correctly?  

Description:
This course completes the early phase of the grammar school study of spelling and handwriting. Students are introduced to cursive writing and continue to memorize important spelling rules. These fundamentals of expression are essential for all future studies in the school.This is done through: class spelling bees; integration of handwriting with other subjects; integration with other subjects in writing / oral presentations; flip and write, alphabetization, and other spelling review exercises from our spelling series; practicing handwriting with handwriting worksheets; discussing connections between spelling and the grade level theme of the Seven Virtues as relevant.

Literature/Reading
Theme/Master


Question: 
How do the people in stories help us to live for God better?  

Description:
The aim of this course is to help students adequately improve their reading skills, their understanding of literature, and their application of literary skills. Third-grade literature focuses on works that are thematically related to the history track or push students to more complex reading levels.   

This is done through: small reading groups where students read orally, listen, and follow along with other students; individual oral reading to the class, teacher, teacher’s aide or parent volunteer; discussion about the book, in large or small group, and answering oral and written questions; using pictures, objects, projects, personal stories, guest speakers, and field trips to increase comprehension and vocabulary, relating as much as possible to the lives of the students; providing time for silent reading and teacher or guest reading to students; integration with art, Bible, grammar, history, Latin, etc.

Math
Theme/Master

Question:
 
How do numbers show the perfection of God’s creation?Description:This course continues the grammar school study of arithmetic. Students should demonstrate an increasing understanding that God gave us numbers and mathematical systems to help us in life and to also help us understand His immutable (unchangeable) and logical character.    

This is done through: 
teaching is primarily lectures and coaching, presenting new material and reviewing with the class using individual whiteboards at the desk, followed by working with students individually and in small groups to practice problem-solving strategies and conceptual thinking about math; emphasis is placed on the logical evaluation of how and why math works and rote memorization of math facts; math is connected as often as possible to real-life situations and challenges; math drills, games, small-group work, individual instruction, flashcards, individual goals for accuracy/speed, timed tests, and various worksheets for enhancement; demonstration of objectives with the use of manipulatives, such as fraction circles, measuring tools for length and volume, and student clocks; class begins each day with a brief activity, questions to consider, or a math drill to prepare for the lesson or review.

History/Geography
Theme Question: 
New Testament, Ancient Greece, and Rome

Description:
This course continues the grammar school study of history, focusing primarily on Ancient Greece and Rome. Students focus on the key figures and events of the time period and celebrate a Greek Olympics Day in the fall.     

This is done through: primarily reading and discussion-oriented class periods, based on individual or in-class readings as well as lectures, guest speakers, and PowerPoints; debates, recitations, reading, worksheets, student presentations, and skits; viewing and discussing pertinent works of art, literature, music, and poetry; class should begin each day with a brief activity, questions to consider, or written response designed to focus the class and prepare students for the lesson; chanting and singing the series of events in the chronology; field trips to related sites and museum exhibits; building models, making drawings, writing stories, playing games, and making collections and displays.

Science
Theme/Master


Question:
Why does King David say we are “fearfully and wonderfully made?”

Description:
This course continues the grammar school science program, emphasizing the skill of observation and developing a sense of wonder about God’s creation. Students will study various areas of science, including the human body (skeletal, digestive, nervous, and circulatory systems) volcanoes, and the solar system.    

This is done through: 
teaching is primarily lecture and discussion, during which the instructor introduces or reviews concepts from student readings and students respond; class begins each day with a brief activity, questions to consider, or written response designed to focus the class discussion and prepare students for the lesson; laboratory work and experimentation are parts of the class, both individually and in groups; drawings, models, and PowerPoints; oral reports; guest speakers and field trips.

Latin
Theme/Master


Question: 
The Seven Virtues/Why is Latin a special language in history? 

Description:
This course begins a two and half-year grammar school program that lays a foundation for learning Latin based on comprehensible input methods.    

This is done through: 
Latin instruction should follow comprehensive input methods as much as possible.  The teacher will speak slowly, engage in an unceasing repetition of phrases, and keep speech at a level where students comprehend what is said. New Latin structures should be used and practiced repeatedly until students are familiar with them. Latin workbook activities. Readings from Latin readers.Large group oral translationsIndividual oral translations Acting out of Latin stories Latin songs. As applicable, identify and discuss examples of the class theme of the Seven Virtues of Fortitude, Temperance, Justice, Prudence, Faith, Hope and Love.
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Instilling a Love of Learning in Every Student!

Colquitt Christian Academy's Mission is to provide an academically challenging program, to create a love of learning in every student, to instill the habits of success in every student, and to prepare the student to be a responsible and productive member of the community.

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